“The 5 Love Languages: Singles Edition”–Review

51AXd5ixNpL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Great advice for any relationship.

In The 5 Love Languages, the reader learns how to give and receive love in different types of love languages, which helps their relationships—not just romantic relationships—to grow.  I’ve never read the original book; however, it’s been recommended to me.

The singles edition describes the 5 love languages: words of affirmation, acts of service, receiving gifts, quality time, and physical touch.  Each chapter will help the reader:

  • Understand themselves and others better
  • Relate to others more confidently
  • Grow closer to family and friends
  • Discover the missing ingredient in past relationships
  • Date more successfully.

This book is definitely helpful for those who would like to learn the love languages of their family members, friends, significant others, etc.  Not sure what your love language is, no problem.  The book includes a quiz to reveal your language.  In fact, I still need to take the quiz.  And if you’ve ever been curious about online dating, there’s a section in the back of the book giving the pros and cons.  This was worth the read, in my opinion.

Feel free to post your comments.  Happy reading!

*I received this copy from Moody Publishers, in exchange for an honest review.

About the author: Gary Chapman is an author, speaker, and counselor, who has a passion for helping people form lasting relationships.  He is the bestselling author of The 5 Love Languages series and the director of Marriage and Family Life Consultants, Inc.  Gary travels the world presenting seminars, and his radio programs air on more than 400 stations.  For more info on the author, click here.

Words of Discouragement? I Think Not.

I am participating in the writing contest, You Deserve to Be Inspired, hosted by Positive Writer.

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” my mother asked me when I was a kid.  “An author,” I said.  At that time, I was influenced by almost any books my older sister read when we were kids.  And then my journal writing began when I was in the fifth grade and I became addicted to writing every day.  Every now and then, I’d write a story or two.  But why I wound up throwing them away, afterward, was beyond me.  Perhaps the story ideas were just terrible or I feared embarrassment should someone discover what I’d written.

No matter, I stuck with my writing routine.  I daydreamed.  I wrote about what I liked, what I didn’t like, new ideas, etc.  In high school, I had a novel in progress, but I never told anyone about it.  I do remember rewriting it a few times.  Ideas were constantly changing and I didn’t know how to go about it, sometimes.  I was still unsure as to what I was going to do with it when and if it was done.  Fear may have been holding me back.  But what was scaring me?

When time passed, though, I put the story away, with the same idea that the story was terrible and wasn’t going to go anywhere, that the story was boring even me.  In November 2014, however, I’d surprised myself by bringing that novel back, just with a new storyline.  One year later—while I was tempted to quit dozens of times—the first draft was finally done.  What an emotional rollercoaster it was while typing up the last few chapters.

In my mind, I was thanking those who encouraged me to keep writing, including those with negative comments.  Yes, even those with negative comments because it made me think back to my sophomore year in high school.  I don’t remember which class it was, nor do I remember the teacher’s name.  During class, we were assigned something involving career choices.  All I remember was that the instructions looked as if they were written in another language.  Really, I could have asked questions, yet I was a bit of a lazy student.  Also, I was the type who was often afraid of asking questions.  So I marked off anything at random, with the assumption I knew what I was doing.

Afterward, the teacher had one-on-one discussions with us regarding the categories we selected.  Once she looked over my work, she appeared confused by my answers, but then explained how the assignment was supposed to be done.  Then she asked me a bunch of questions about my interests and that’s when I told her about my writing.  I don’t recall every question she asked, but I remember her asking if I spoke more than one language.  I said no.  Every answer I’d provided to every question, in the end, forced her to look right at me and say, “Then you can’t be a writer.”  This was coming from someone who’s never read anything I’ve written. I’ve had my share of teachers bullying me, but never has any one of them said what that teacher said to me.  But the worst part was that I didn’t even defend myself.  She must have thought I was a complete idiot.  So I’d spaced out in class.  Was I so terrible?

I never sulked about it, though, nor did I go home and cry to my mother.  Perhaps I was realizing that that was only one person’s opinion.  This teacher may not have been too fond of me, but that didn’t stop me from writing.  In fact, I never did tell anyone what the teacher said.  I suppose I really didn’t care what she thought.

So when the first draft of my novel was completed in October 2015, I thought, “I can’t be a writer, huh?  Hmm, I don’t know.  It may have taken a year of struggling, but somehow I did it.”  And I’ll keep doing it.  At times, I still can’t believe I made it happen. Who knows what’ll happen with my writing?  But after seeing all the progress I’ve made, I realized it’s worth the hard work.

Throughout this writing journey, I’ve learned some things:

 

  1. People will have their own opinions and that’s okay. We can’t please everyone, so don’t let their words stop you.
  2. Even if you have ideas you feel are terrible, hold onto them, anyhow; they may be helpful in the future. Never did I expect to bring back that story I’d created years ago and actually finish it.
  3. Although we all struggle with a particular goal, it’s important that we believe in ourselves. We’ll get there, eventually.

 

So to my high school teacher—whose name escapes me—thanks for your words, because I’m still writing, no matter anyone’s opinions.

“Not Exactly Love”–Review

41gn49ulxjl-_sx322_bo1204203200_Part memoir, part warm-hearted look at the ’70s, and part therapeutic journey, Not Exactly Love: A Memoir is an intense and inspirational story of a woman who grew from her experience.

It was in 1969 when Betty—a single schoolteacher—met Jack, a handsome but edgy new teacher at her school.  When they got to know each other, they clicked instantly.  Their relationship was filled with happy times and Betty couldn’t ask for anything more…

But when they got married, Jack was a different person.  He was quick-tempered.  He’d easily get angry about anything, taking it all out on Betty.  His fits of rage constantly ended up in verbal and physical violence.  Every day seemed to be unpredictable.  Was Jack going to be in a good mood?  Was he going to be angry?  Betty had to live with her decisions on a daily basis.  When Jack was loving, Betty tried to assure herself that their lives would be better.  But when the rage would come back, she didn’t know what to do.

Because nearly 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men in the U.S. suffer from physical violence from a partner, Betty had to see the reality of her marriage and decide whether or not her marriage was worth saving or to save her own life.

This is great memoir.  It was almost like reading a thriller novel.  It’s just sad to think about situations such as these because, although it doesn’t excuse it, there’s always a story behind the violent outcomes.  This book is an inspirational read, especially because it raises awareness of domestic violence.

Feel free to post your comments.  Happy reading!

About the author: Betty Hafner lives outside Washington, DC and has written a popular monthly book column for twelve years in The Town Courier newspapers in Montgomery County, MD. With a M.S. in counseling, she was a teacher and counselor in high schools and colleges for twenty-five years. She continues to lead workshops, give talks, and facilitate groups. She wrote two practical career-change books that stemmed from her workshops―Where Do I Go From Here? (Lippincott) and The Nurse’s Guide to Starting a Small Business (Pilot Books). Always ready to converse, she also loves telling stories through her drawings, photographs, and writing.  Follow her on Twitter and you can check out her website here.

“The Long Journey to Jake Palmer”–Review

410mbxgu66l-_sx322_bo1204203200_What if there was a place where everything wrong in your life could be fixed?

That’s an interesting question.  What if there was such a place?  And would you be willing to find it?  In this story, Jake Palmer is a corporate trainer who coaches people to see deeper into themselves, to motivate and provide inspiration to their lives.  The problem, however, is that Jake no longer practices what he preaches.  Recently divorced and after a near-death experience, Jake is discouraged with life.  Even after his seminars, he questions his own purposes, all the while feeling sorry for himself and just wanting to be left alone.

Although he’s not too excited about the idea, Jake agrees to meet his close friends at a lake-house for a ten-day vacation.  While he’s there, Jake is informed of the legend of Willow Lake, where a lost corridor leads to a place where one’s longings can be fulfilled, where their lives can be completely healed.  Jake’s not sure what to believe.  Although he considers the idea absurd, he still can’t help feeling tempted to find this corridor.  And when he meets a man who talks of particular beliefs of the corridor, Jake becomes determined to find this path, to find himself, and to have his life back.

This book is quite an inspirational read and I’m happy for having the opportunity to read and share this with you.  It definitely wasn’t what I expected, but it was great.  Some of the scenes where almost as if I’d stepped into a fantasy novel and I liked the creativity behind it.  Sometimes, no matter where we are in our lives, we all could use that little push.  I don’t want to spoil it, so I’ll just recommend you check it out.  Feel free to post your comments.  Happy reading!

FTC Disclosure: I received this copy from BookLook Bloggers, in exchange for an honest review.

About the author: James L. Rubart is a professional marketer and speaker.  He is the author of the bestselling novel Rooms, as well as Book of Days, The Chair, the Well Spring Novels, and The Five Times I Met Myself.  He lives with his wife and sons in the Pacific Northwest.  You can visit his websiteTwitter, or Facebook.

“Unstoppable”—A Review

Being unstoppable is about believing and achieving.  It’s about having faith in yourself, your talents, your purpose, and most of all, in God’s great love and His divine plan for your life.

Unstoppable: The Incredible Power of Faith in Action, by Nick Vujicic, provides inspirational stories of Nick’s hardships.  Because he was born without arms and legs, he had to overcome the many obstacles and trials to get where his is today.  Just when he thought that he’d hit rock-bottom, he realized that having faith in himself was going to make him a stronger person.  Not only did having faith guide him on a daily basis, his passion for helping others made him a better person.

Throughout the book, Nick guides the readers on how to achieve their own success and happiness, as well as how to start believing in themselves.  He also discusses topics, such as:

  • Personal crises
  • Relationship issues
  • Career and job challenges
  • Health and disability concerns
  • Self-destructive thoughts, emotions, and addictions
  • Bullying, persecution, cruelty, and intolerance
  • Imbalance in body, mind, heart, and spirit
  • Feeling out of control

It was over a year ago that I was introduced to one of Nick’s YouTube videos and I really enjoyed his speech.  He was funny and I enjoyed his positive energy.  As for this book, I did enjoy reading it.  I, especially, was interested in the topic of bullying and the effects it can have on people, as well as the fact that awareness of bullying needs to be addressed.  Bullying not only occurs in schools, it occurs everywhere else, such as in the home and the workplace.

One of the passages that I really liked is where Nick says: “Many people struggle to find meaning and direction in their lives. They question their value because they aren’t clear on how they can contribute or make a mark. Maybe you haven’t identified where your talents and interests lie. It’s not uncommon to cast about trying one thing or another before identifying your life’s calling. Changing course several times is increasingly common. I encourage you to identify whatever it is that fulfills you and engages all your gifts and energy…Be patient if it takes time to find your way. Know that timing is important and that as long as you hold a true passion in your heart, it will not fade. Understand that even passions can come with risk.”

Nick’s advice is to always put your “faith into action” and to believe in the power of prayer.  Although I’m not a religious person, I do enjoy an inspirational story, on occasions.  I’d recommend this book for anyone who is looking for an inspirational story for self-improvement, success, etc.  The topics in this story can really benefit others.

For the author’s info, click the link Unstoppablebelow:

http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/author-spotlight.php?authorid=107506

FTC Disclaimer: I received this book for free from Blogging for Books, for this review.